Day 24, Mar 23, Returning to Minamisoma

March 11, 2011. I was on a flight above the Pacific Ocean. My plane was originally scheduled to land in Tokyo at around 3pm. I did not make it, though. The Tokyo flight was delayed. I was detoured to San Francisco on my way to Taipei. I barely missed the earthquake.

I went to Taipei for my solo exhibition. The show opened the next day. The title was “Improbable Waves.” The main image was a painterly animation of stormy blue waves. For the audience and myself, the connection to the tsunami was uncanny. My close colleague, James Nakagawa, was also having a show in Taipei. We counseled each other about our concerns for his mother and my sister, both living in Tokyo.

These dots may not be related. They do seem to form a path, however. Sometimes it felt like an experience from the past life. A fortune teller once said the metaphor of my chart is an island. I am bound to make circles.

I made another circle today by returning to Minamisoma, the starting point of my walk. I went to see a friend. Atsunobu Katagiri (片桐功敦) is an Ikebana master from Osaka. He has been working on a project inside the 20 kilometer radius of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. He collects flowers and debris around there, and turns them into Ikebana. He does it both on location and in a local museum. In the museum, he combines the work with pre-historic potteries from Jomon Period. The work connects the current event to the land and its ancient past.

2011年3月11日。私は太平洋上を渡る旅客機に乗っていた。私の飛行機は、午後3時頃に東京に着陸する予定だった。だがそうはならなかった。東京行きの飛行機が遅れ、私は東京経由で台北へ戻るはずが、サンフランシスコを経由することになった。ほんのわずかな時間のずれのおかげで、地震から逃れたわけだ。

私が台北へ行ったのは、私の個展のためだった。個展はその翌日に始まった。タイトルは、「信じがたい波」。嵐のように激しく寄せては返す青い波。その映像を絵画のように加工編集したイメージを主とする映像アニメーションだった。私の個展のテーマと、折しもその前日に起こった日本の津波との奇妙なまでの照合は、個展の観客にも私自身にも、不気味としか言いようがなかった。私の親しい同僚、ジェームズ中川も、ちょうど同じ時に台北で作品の展示をしていた。私たちは東京に住むお互いの家族――ジェームズの母親と、私の妹――の安否を気遣い、お互いを慰め励ましあった。

これら一つ一つの点は互いに何の関係もないかもしれない。だがつなげてみると、一本の道筋を形成するようにも思える。私の前世の経験とつながっているのだろうかという気がすることもある。かつてある占い師に、私の運命図のメタファー(隠喩)は「島」だと言われたことがある。私の人生の道は円を描くように運命づけられているのかもしれない。

そして今日、私はまたもうひとつの円を描いた。今回の旅の起点である南相馬市へ戻ってきたのだ。ここへ戻ってきたのは、ある友人に会うためだ。片桐功敦(かたぎりあつのぶ)は、大阪を拠点に活躍するいけばな作家だ。彼は今、福島第一原発から20km圏内の土地での作品制作・展示プロジェクトを行っている。この土地で、自らの手で花や津波の残骸・瓦礫を集め、それらを用いて生け花にするというものだ。材料を集めたその場所での展示と、地元の美術館での展示とを並行して行っている。美術館での展示では、縄文土器という前史的土器も作品に取り入れている。彼のそうした作品たちは、いまという事象をその土地に結びつけ、またその土地の前史的過去にも結びつける取り組みだ。

P1012607

I told Katagiri my project in Tohoku was almost like scripted by fate. He felt the same way about his. His father was in the biggest plane crash in aviation history. Katagiri was 11 years old. Their blood type is RH negative. He was rushed to the crash site in case his father needed it. No one survived. He witnessed a gruesome sight. As a teenager, Katagiri was lost. He moved to the US for a number of years. His family runs an Ikebana school for many generations. He returned and inherited the school when he was 25.

Katagiri grew up around Ikebana but never really practiced it back then. He had to teach himself by books. “You don’t get to ask questions when ‘you’ are the master.”, he said. I think his father guided him in some way, though, just like the way he was brought here. His father died at the age of 41, a year presumed by Japanese to be dangerous. Katagiri turned 41 this year. He chose to make peace with his past by coming to a place riddled by tragedies. The work is a ritual. We share a deep kindred spirit.

私は片桐に、私の東北プロジェクトは、最初から運命に定められていたような気がすると話した。彼も自分のプロジェクトについて同じように感じているという。彼の父親は、史上最大級の航空事故を起こした飛行機に乗っていた。父親と彼の血液型がどちらもRHマイナスだったため、当時11歳だった片桐は、万一必要な場合に備えて事故現場に大至急連れて行かれた。現場に着いてみると、生存者は一人もいなかった。片桐は、見るもおぞましい光景を目の当たりにせざるをえなかった。その後、十代の片桐は自分を見失っていたという。中学卒業後渡米し、何年もの間米国で過ごした。彼の実家は大阪に数世代続くいけばな流派の家元であったため、彼は21歳で帰国、その後25歳で家元を襲名した。

片桐は幼少の頃からいけばなに自然に触れてはいたが、その当時はそれまで実際に花を生けたことはほとんどなく、華道のことは何も知らないも同然だったという。彼は本をしゃにむに読み、独学で華道を学んだ。「何せ自分が『家元』なんですから、誰かに教えてくださいって質問するわけにもいかなかったんですよ」。片桐はそういうが、私は彼の父親が何らかの形で彼を導いた面もあるような気がする。ちょうど彼がこの福島原発の事故の跡地に導かれてきたのと同じように。彼の父親は41歳、日本でいう厄年で亡くなった。片桐は、悲劇に惑わされたこの場所に来ることで、彼自身の過去と和解しようとしている。だから彼の作品制作は一種の儀式といえるだろう。私たちは魂の深い部分で類似したものを分かち合い、共鳴しあっている。

Note: Ikebana is the art of floral arrangement in Japan. The lower image was taken from Katagiri’s project catalog.

注:文中二番目の写真は、片桐のプロジェクトのカタログから転載したもの。

Japanese translation by Michiko Owaki    日本語訳:大脇美智子

3 thoughts

  1. Very interesting story… your path of life does seem to make circles and resonate with other people who also has a strong sense of fate. Your journey in Tohoku has always made sense to me, but it does so even more now. I am truly glad and feel lucky to be a (very humble) part of your project, Arthur. By the way, I love both of the images of Master Katagiri’s ikebana pieces. The theme of his exhibition and his vision (of creating beautiful pieces from debris and flowers he collected in the area) also resonates with the philosophy of Ikebana – to capture/represent the ethereal beauty of the mortality of life and nature.

  2. It gave me goose bumps when I read this post. What a compelling story and it’s very well told. It often seems that dramatic events connect people in an unexplainable way. When looking from a cosmic perspective, though, we are all connected energetically. And people with the same vibe, often expressed with the same intention, resonate.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *